About Writing

Endings

I’ve reached the point where I had planned on ending the story in my current WIP, only to discover that I even kind of hate myself with how inconclusive in feels.

I realized that there needed to be a sequel about a month or so ago, which was heartbreaking because I always figured my attention span was too short to write serials (naturally, I’m saying this after I spent close to a year on a single rough draft), but the story demands more, and thus I have no choice. There will be a book two.

I figured that I could go ahead with the ending of book number one as originally planned, since it was open enough to seamlessly slide into a sequel without any problems. Now that I have it written down, I’ve realized that it’s actually a giant cliffhanger with too many incomplete threads left dangling. Wow. After all this time, how could I not realize that the ending needed to be more complete?

I need to wrap something up, even if I leave the big picture unfinished for the sequel. I just don’t know what can be conveniently closed for good.

So instead of declaring the draft finished, I’m back to the drawing board.

Ah, writing. You tricky demon.

About Writing

Music and Writing

For the past several months, I’ve been working on the rough draft of a new novel, and for the past several months, I’ve been listening to Kamelot on repeat. Specifically, the song, “The Last Day of Sunlight” (which as far as I can tell has not been posted YouTube).

When my husband commented on it, I muttered vaguely about how that particular song “kept the channel open” for writing my novel.

Music is a powerful tool for putting one in a specific mindset for writing. Each story has a different “feeling” about it, and finding a song that suits that “feeling” is often a powerful way of tuning in to inspiration and creativity. I don’t know if this is something I can explain accurately, but I’m certain that those who have experienced it know exactly what I’m talking about.

Often, the earliest stages of a novel involve also finding the music that fits the story, to compose the playlist that will sustain the channel of creativity for the duration of writing. Then, I will listen to that playlist on repeat, to the exclusion of pretty much everything else.

Even if it does start to wear on everyone I live with.

Thankfully, my husband understands.