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Merino Wool

I kettle dyed 1.5lbs of merino roving, which is very soft but still easy to spin into yarn.

My pan was big enough to hold about 4oz of wool, so I ended up doing it in six batches. I measured out the dye and water to keep the colors consistent, but I varied the way I applied it to keep things unique and interesting.

Next, spinning it into a 3-ply yarn.

About Me

Rose Quartz handspun yarn

Purchased from here

My phone kept automatically changing the color balance while I was taking pictures, which I found to be thoroughly amusing and decided to run with it.

Guess which one is the most accurate? 😀

Anywho, this yarn is going to be a new pair of mittens for yours truly.

About Me

Homespun Yarn

Sandalwood Merino Wool Roving from Busy Bee Fibers

I definitely spin yarn like a beginner, but the fun thing is that it doesn’t matter. Seriously. Once it’s knitted/crocheted, you can barely tell that there were any inconsistencies.

Normally I don’t go for earth tones, but that roving was too scrumptiously beautiful to resist. I don’t know what it is, but that combination of colors just tickles me.

Now I need to figure out what to make with it…

About Me

Crochet Hanger Covers pattern

Truth be told, this post is more for the anecdote than a crochet pattern…

Once upon a time when I was little, my mom taught me how to crochet hanger covers.

The white was the first one I ever made, and the other was after I had gotten a little bit better at crochet. They originally had pompoms, but those got lost somewhere along the way. Wasn’t I so cute back then? I didn’t have the slightest clue how to control the yarn, lol.

And this is what I can do now:

The funny part is, my mom actually hates making hanger covers. She’s quit for good, and has absolutely no interest in ever picking it back up again. As for me, I love it, through and through. I like how pretty the hangers are, and how clothes don’t slip off of them while I’m rummaging through my closet.

Now, I believe that the wood hangers used to make these are no longer being manufactured. I got mine from ebay, and there are usually a few in thrift stores, but the general consensus is that no one knows where to get them anymore. But hey, with some basic woodworking skills, you could totally corner the market!

This is the variation of the vintage favorite pattern that’s been passed down through my family:

Size H hook
Worsted weight yarn

Make 2

Ch 58
dc in third chain from hook, 4 dc in same sp (5dc)

*skip 2 ch, sc, skip 2, 6dc* across. In final ch sp, 12dc around to other side. Continue pattern across the bottom, mirroring the top.

In the last space with 5 dc, make 6dc then sl st into top of ch2.

Creates 10 shells total.

Place wrong sides together, and slip stitch the top of the two pieces together. Slide hanger hook in between stitches in the center, then continue slip stitching across the bottom with the hanger inside.

Weave in ends

Decorate!

Pompoms are more traditional, but they also look beautiful with crocheted flowers. Leave tail ends to tie around the hanger hook, then weave them in.

About Me

Crochet Hangers and more

You’re a hard core loser if you don’t own at least a dozen of these bad boys.

Also, I’m kind of addicted to spinning yarn. I made the green meself (I bought the cream online a couple years ago for some project or other i dont remember).

The pattern can be found here.

Also, because I know that you’re dying of curiosity, I finished making this out of the pink and yellow roving: